One final achievement for Kotikan


It’s been over a year since we sold Kotikan to FanDuel – it was an emotional journey to move on from what we had spent so many years building. And working in a team with so many great people too. I’m glad that most of my colleagues are still working at FanDuel – they even won another Webby Award this year!

But life moves on. Even after leaving FanDuel myself I couldn’t quite get my thoughts in order enough to write too much about it – and looking at my blog the only entry over that time was about the decision to leave, nothing about what we had created or what it was like to be part of the selling process. I guess it was either too recent in my mind or too separate from what I was moving on to that the opportunity to write passed me by.

Then one day Gav Dutch tells me that Kotikan has been short listed for “Sale of the Year” at the Deals & Dealmakers Awards 2016 – wow! I was blown away. It’s incredible to think that our humble company, built by many folk doing it for the first time and all of us learning as we went, has been short listed alongside business names from a completely different world. Wish us luck on the night – partly because it would be great to win but also because I’m not sure I’ll keep up in conversation!

The “I only know people who voted X” effect


Sadly one of the biggest issues with social media and the “relevance” algorithms is that we each only see (for the most part) posts from people who share our own views. What this means is that Facebook, Twitter and the like are (maybe indirectly) more in control of the campaigning than those who are trying to disseminate a message. This makes social networks a very dangerous and polarising platform for political debate.
When will people wake up to the fact that having corporations in charge of our “free speech” is dangerous. We need a free and open platform for conversations and information sharing – a truly open inter-network maybeūüėČ.

Please think before you allow your mind to be made up by what an app or website tells you what to believe in!

Why do companies revert to hierarchy?


A question that I’ve asked myself many times over the last couple of years has resurfaced in light of the recent GitHub restructuring. Why do companies resort to hierarchy? So many set out with the grand ambition of keeping a flat structure – and many manage for a long time. People are happy, they are respected, communication is good and everyone can contribute to the future of the company in meaningful ways.

But with almost predictable inevitability it is at some point decided that structure is required to make the company more efficient. Whether it’s at 50, 100 or 500 people (which is a surprising spread of company sizes), visibility decreases and communication falters in a way that seems to say “we need structure” – but why; and is it even true?

So many traditional business experts seem to consider the way that start-ups organise themselves to be cute or naive and, whilst potentially fun, doomed to failure. Is there only 1 sensible way to structure a business? Or is there something significant we should be learning from the new generation of young companies desperate to prove that it can be done another way?

From my own experiences I know that it’s easier to go with the status quo. But I can’t figure out the reason why the flat structure becomes too much hard work. If there is a clear understanding of responsibilities and an efficient communication channel why can we not have a company made of many small teams that are themselves still operating as a start-up would?

Maybe it’s just a pipe dream but I’d be interested in finding out if anyone has made it work, or understands why it fails…

2016, a whole different year


I think this year is going to be an exciting one¬†for me – first and foremost it’s going to mean finding a whole new bunch of fantastic people to work with. I’ve made the difficult decision to move on from FanDuel and I will be¬†leaving behind the amazing people¬†I’ve spent the last 5 years getting to know.

Since we sold Kotikan to FanDuel last year they’ve been very welcoming of the whole team and we have seen great collaboration with the various internal platform teams. This means cool new¬†things for the mobile apps that we were already working on and the possibility of exciting¬†new features that just were not possible as an external agency.

But having decided to move on where will I be? All over the place! I’ll be spending some of my time working with technology start-ups – offering advice or support in creating, growing or developing¬†their software delivery teams. Initially I’m looking to work with Codebase and Bright Red Triangle based companies, but I’d be happy to chat to teams from other backgrounds too. I’m also going to be spending some time working on Open Source Software (such as the IDE I’ve been working on) – there are so many great things being pushed forward and I want to be part of the future of free software and the communities taking it¬†out to industry and consumers.

Thanks so much to everyone who’s been involved in my journey¬†at Loc8Solutions / Kotikan / FanDuel – I hope to work with you all again soonūüôā

Multi-touch on Enlightenment


At FOSDEM yesterday I was demoing the Enlightenment IDE that I have been working on. My laptop is a touchscreen and I had it in tablet mode for the demo, so far so good. Until a couple of sharp attendees noted that there was no multi-touch. Huh, neither it does.

Enter rasterman – “Did you enable xinput2.2?”, erm no, no I didn’t…

Passing –enable-xinput22 to the efl ./configure fixed it! magicūüôā The image above shows 2 taps simultaneously in the elementary_test Gesture Layer 2 demo.

Job done. Now to fix a couple of multi-touch gesture bugs I have foundūüė¶.